Effectiveness of code-switching in language classroom in India at primary level: A case of L2 teachers’ perspectives

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47750/pegegog.11.04.37

Keywords:

Bilingualism, code-switching, first language (L1), language classroom, second language (L2) learners

Abstract

The current study explores the effectiveness of code-switching (CS) in language classroom, a case of second language (L2) teachers’ perspectives. Code-switching (CS) refers to a usage of the two languages in conversation and it also relates to a ‘language mixing’. CS may occur between sentences, known as 'inter-sentential code-switching’; and it may also occur within a sentence, known as 'intra-sentential code-switching’. Code-switching is a linguistic feature of multi-lingual societies, as they are gifted with more privileges to use various languages. The current study points out the perceptions of language teachers towards code-switching in the classroom in the process of teaching and the purposes of code-switching in teaching. The data for the study includes the responses of the attitudinal test questions designed on a Likert Scale of 20 teacher- respondents from the two schools of Delhi-NCR. The outcome of the study illustrates that the predominance of code-switching in the classrooms is used to interpret complex ideas, translate questions, seek confirmation, check students understanding, also to build solidarity and code-switching is most prevalent in primary education. Hence, code-switching is a distinctive linguistic requirement in education but there is a negative towards the use of CS in the classroom. 

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Author Biographies

Tribhuwan Kumar, Assistant Professor of English, College of Science and Humanities at Sulail, Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Al Kharj, Saudi Arabia

Dr. Tribhuwan Kumar is an Assistant Professor in the College of Science and Humanities, Sulail at Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia, where he has been a faculty member since 2015. Before joining this university, he has taught in many institutions in India since 2010 including SRM University, NCR Campus, and Ghaziabad. His research areas are British Literature, Indian English Literature, Applied Linguistics, Discourse Analysis, and other interdisciplinary subjects in language and literature

Venkanna Nukapangu, Assistant Professor of English, College of Science and Humanities at Sulail Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia

Dr. Venkanna Nukapangu is currently serving as an Assistant Professor in the College of Science and Humanities, Sulail at Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia. He has more than 5 years of working experience as Assistant Professor. His research interests include English Literature, English Language Teaching and other areas in Linguistics. 

Ahdi Hassan, Global Institute for Research Education & Scholarship, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Ahdi Hassan is serving as a Researcher at Global Institute for Research Education & Scholarship, Amsterdam, Netherlands and representative of Imperial English UK-A Trusted British Brand in English Language, Independent Research International [IRI] and Advisor Scholarly Journal Management.
He has been Associate or Consulting Editor of numerous journals and also served the editorial review board from 2013- to till now. He has a number of publications and research papers published in various domains. Founder of Pakistani languages corpora and has earned his master’s degree in Linguistics from Quaid-i- Azam University, Islamabad in 2013.
He has given contribution with the major roles such as using modern and scientific techniques to work with sounds and meanings of words, studying the relationship between the written and spoken formats of various Asian/European languages, developing the artificial languages in coherence with modern English language, and scientifically approaching the various ancient written material to trace its origin. He teaches topics connected but not limited to communication such as English for Young Learners, English for Academic Purposes, English for Science, Technology and Engineering, English for Business and Entrepreneurship, Business Intensive Course, Applied Linguistics, interpersonal communication, verbal and nonverbal communication, cross cultural competence, language and humor, intercultural communication, culture and humor, language acquisition and language in use.

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Published

2021-10-06

How to Cite

Kumar, T., Nukapangu, V., & Hassan, A. (2021). Effectiveness of code-switching in language classroom in India at primary level: A case of L2 teachers’ perspectives. Pegem Journal of Education and Instruction, 11(4), 379–385. https://doi.org/10.47750/pegegog.11.04.37